On Remaining Patient

It’s so close! That first complete draft is so close I can taste it. This is a very crucial time in the creative process. I must remain patient.

Recently, I have come to the building climax of Life With a View. I think it’s important to have a strong climax in a story. I feel it should be there to give a sense of swell and a bit of accomplishment to the story. It’s easy to do in action because it’s usually some sort of battle that needs to be overcome. In drama, the climax can be a little more slippery. There isn’t always one right way to do it, resulting in a confluence of things that result in the climax.

But whatever the climax is, I believe great care and time should be spent on it. Because excitement tends to rush things along, the excitement of the climax needs to be tempered with patience on the part of the creator.

At the same time, spending too much time on the climax takes away from the journey itself. I’m reminded of journalist Paul Salopek, who is doing his Out of Eden Walk. He is currently walking the path early humans took out of Africa.

Walking.

It’s about seeing, experiencing life at a slower pace. Slowing down. To enjoy the moment.

Sometimes it’s drudgery.
Sometimes it’s exciting.

But we need all these moments to form a complete picture of our lives, and our creations.

The end is not so much an end as it is a pausing point. A time to reflect on the journey you’ve taken so far. In life, it can be wherever you want it to be: at the end of each day, week, year; at the finish of a project; drinking a cup of tea.

The novel has an end, but it’s the journey there that makes the ending and resulting reflection so worthwhile.

So keep that excitement in check and enjoy every moment of the journey.

That said, *rubs palms together* I can’t wait to start editing!

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One thought on “On Remaining Patient

  1. Very good to hear that you’re making lots of progress with your book, Matthew. Feeling very happy for you. That is an interesting subject, the climax of a story. I suppose it’s the part of the story where everything comes together: the heart and main message of the story manifests at that point ever so clearly. Sort of like putting the last piece of puzzle onto the puzzle before you frame it up.

    Agree that the story climax is hard to create. It can come a few chapters before the end of the story, or maybe even the last page of the story.

    Don’t know if you’ve come across this article on drafting and editing: http://goinswriter.com/how-to-write-a-book/

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